The Styling Librarian

In my opinion, books are the best accessory.

Styling Librarian: PYP Profile Books: Knowledgeable

I decided to focus on PYP Profile connected books first since that is usually what schools initially focus on when introducing PYP to their students. One of my favorite PYP Profile book links is this one: http://pyplibrary.wikispaces.com/ I decided to separate them into 10 posts for profile and attitude lists instead. This will be an ongoing series. Hope it will be useful for my PYP educator friends.

BOOKS TO REINFORCE UNDERSTANDING OF PROFILES:

profiles

Knowledgable:

Featured Book:

The Incredible book eating boy – Oliver Jeffers – Goodreads Summary: “Like many children, Henry loves books. But Henry doesn’t like to read books, he likes to eat them. Big books, picture books, reference books . . . if it has pages, Henry chews them up and swallows (but red ones are his favorite). And the more he eats, the smarter he gets—he’s on his way to being the smartest boy in the world! But one day he feels sick to his stomach. And the information is so jumbled up inside, he can’t digest it! Can Henry find a way to enjoy books without using his teeth? With a stunning new artistic style and a die-cut surprise, Oliver Jeffers celebrates the joys of reading in this charming and quirky picture book. It’s almost good enough to eat.”
http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/library/books/theincrediblebookeatingboy.htm
http://literacylaunchpad.blogspot.hk/2011/09/incredible-book-eating-boy.html

A Grain of Rice – Helena Claire Pittman – Goodreads Summary: “A clever, cheerful, hard-working farmer’s son wins the hand of a Chinese princess by outwitting her father the Emperor, who treasures his daughter more than all the rice in China.”

Chasing Vermeer – Blue Balliett – Novels – Goodreads Summary: “A puzzling art theft is solved by two sixth-grade sleuths in a first-rate first novel by Blue Balliett, illustrated by Series of Unfortunate Events artist Brett Helquist.”

Click Clack Moo: Cows that Type – Doreen Cronin – Goodreads Summary: “Farmer Brown has a problem. His cows like to type. All day long he hears Click, clack, MOO. Click, clack, MOO. Clickety, clack, MOO. But Farmer Brown’s problems REALLY begin when his cows start leaving him notes….”

Diary of a worm – Doreen Cronin – Goodreads Summary: “This is the diary . . . of a worm. Surprisingly, a worm not that different from you or me: He lives with his parents, plays with his friends, and even goes to school. But unlike you or me, he never has to take a bath, he gets to eat his homework, and because he doesn’t have legs, he just can’t do the hokey pokey — no matter how hard he tries. Oh, and his head looks a lot like his rear end.”

From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler – E.L. Konigsburg – Novel – Goodreads Summary: “When suburban Claudia Kincaid decides to run away, she knows she doesn’t just want to run from somewhere, she wants to run to somewhere — to a place that is comfortable, beautiful, and, preferably, elegant. She chooses the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Knowing her younger brother Jamie has money and thus can help her with a serious cash-flow problem, she invites him along. Once settled into the museum, Claudia and Jamie find themselves caught up in the mystery of an angel statue that the museum purchased at auction for a bargain price of $225. The statue is possibly an early work of the Renaissance master, Michelangelo, and therefore worth millions. Is it? Or isn’t it?  Claudia is determined to find out. Her quest leads her to Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, the remarkable old woman who sold the statue, and to some equally remarkable discoveries about herself.”

Hazel Green – Odo Hirsch – Novel – Goodreads Summary: “Each year, on Frogg Day, a parade fills the streets and children are not allowed to take part, but it hasn’t always been that way and it certainly doesn’t seem fair to Hazel Green. So she decides to rally the children of the Moody Building to build a float for the parade. But things go awry when she is accused of stealing a recipe from her favorite baker and giving it to his rival. At the same time, the children ban her from participating in the parade because she tried to convince them that their float would topple. But with the help of her friend Yakov, a.k.a. “The Yak,” Hazel proves her innocence and leads the children to glory on Frogg Day.”

Heckedy Peg – Audrey Wood – Goodreads Summary: “In this story, seven sweet children are transformed by an evil witch into specific types of food.”

How much poo does an elephant do? And other fascinating facts! – Mitchell Symons – Goodreads Summary: “Did you know that squirrels can’t see the colour red? That Walt Disney, the creator of Mickey Mouse, was afraid of mice? That only 30% of humans can flare their nostrils? Or that every year the average person eats 438 bugs by mistake?”

If the World were a Village – David J. Smith – Goodreads Summary: “Imagine the world’s population, all 6.8 billion of us as a village of just 100 people. Now, If the World Were a Village has been newly revised with updated statistics, several new activities and completely new material on food security, energy and health.”

Mary Anning and the Sea Dragon – Jeannine Atkins – Goodreads Summary: “Mary Anning loved to scour the shores of Lyme Regis, England, where she was born in 1799, for stone sea lilies and shells. Her father had taught her how to use the tools with which she dug into the sand and scraped at the stones that fell from the cliffs. And he had taught her how to look, to look hard, for “curiosities.” One day, when she was eleven, Mary Anning spotted some markings on a wide, flat stone. She chipped at it with her hammer and chisel until the lines of a tooth emerged–and then those of another tooth. Weeks of persistent effort yielded a face about four feet long. But what creature was this? Her brother called it a sea dragon. Many months later, Mary Anning still had not unearthed what she only then learned was called a fossil. But she found out that her discovery was precious and that the painstaking effort to uncover traces of ancient life was profoundly important.”

Me- Jane – Patrick McDonnell – Goodreads Summary: “In his characteristic heartwarming style, Patrick McDonnell tells the story of the young Jane Goodall and her special childhood toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. As the young Jane observes the natural world around her with wonder, she dreams of “a life living with and helping all animals,” until one day she finds that her dream has come true.”

My Great-Aunt Arizona – Gloria Houston – Goodreads Summary: “Arizona was born in a log cabin her papa built. She grew into a tall girl who liked to sing, square-dance, and — most of all — read and dream of the faraway places she would visit one day.
Arizona never did make it to those places. Instead she became a teacher, helping generations of children in the one-room schoolhouse which she herself had attended.”

Off to class: incredible and unusual schools around the world – Susan Hughes – Goodreads Summary: “When North American kids picture a school, odds are they see rows of desks, stacks of textbooks, and linoleum hallways. They probably don’t picture caves, boats, or train platforms — but there are schools in caves, and on boats and on train platforms. There’s a whole world of unusual schools out there! But the most amazing thing about these schools isn’t their location or what they look like. It’s that they provide a place for students who face some of the toughest environmental and cultural challenges, and live some of the most unique lifestyles, to learn. Education is not readily available for kids everywhere, and many communities are strapped for the resources that would make it easier for kids to go to school. In short, it’s not always easy getting kids off to class — but people around the world are finding creative ways to do it.”

Officer Buckle and Gloria – Peggy Rathman – Goodreads Summary: “Officer Buckle is a roly-poly bloke, dedicated to teaching schoolchildren important safety tips, such as never put anything in your ear and never stand on a swivel chair. The problem is, Officer Buckle’s school assemblies are dull, dull, dull, and the children of Napville just sleep, sleep, sleep. That is, until Gloria the police dog is invited along! Stealthily pantomiming each safety tip behind Officer Buckle’s back, Gloria wins the children’s hearts. Meanwhile Officer Buckle assumes the cheers and laughter are all for him.”

Oh, yuck!: the encyclopedia of everything nasty – Terry Sirrell – Goodreads Summary: “Kids love stuff that’s gross. From the liquids, solids, and gases–especially the gases!–or their own bodies to the creepy, crawly, slimy, slithery, fetid, and feculent phenomena in the world at large, kids with a curious bent just can’t get enough. Oh, Yuck! The Encyclopedia of Everything Nastybrings together, in one book, all the good things about some of the baddest things on Earth.”

One grain of rice: a mathematical folktale – Demi – Goodreads Summary: “A reward of one grain of rice doubles day by day into millions of grains of rice when a selfish raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.”

Only one you – Linda Kranz – Goodreads Summary: “There’s only one you in this great big world. Make it a better place. Adri’s mama and papa share some of the wisdom they have gained through the years with their eager son. Their words, simple and powerful, are meant to comfort and guide him as he goes about exploring the world. This exquisitely illustrated book explodes with color and honest insights. Kranz’s uniquely painted rockfish, set against vibrant blue seas, make an unforgettable and truly special impression. Only One You will inspire parents and children of all ages as they swim through the sea of life.”

Starry Messenger – Peter Sis – Goodreads Summary: “In every age there are courageous people who break with tradition to explore new ideas and challenge accepted truths. Galileo Galilei was just such a man–a genius–and the first to turn the telescope to the skies to map the heavens. In doing so, he offered objective evidence that the earth was not the fixed center of the universe but that it and all the other planets revolved around the sun. Galileo kept careful notes and made beautiful drawings of all that he observed. Through his telescope he brought the starts down to earth for everyone to see. By changing the way people saw the galaxy, Galileo was also changing the way they saw themselves and their place in the universe. This was very exciting, but to some to some it was deeply disturbing. Galileo has upset the harmonious view of heaven and earth that had been accepted since ancient times. He had turned the world upside down.”

The Bee Tree – Patricia Polacco – Goodreads Summary: “Searching for a bee tree, Grampa and Mary Ellen chase a bottle of bees through Bishop’s Meadow, into Dunk Woods, and beyond, picking up a group of colorful nineteenth-century characters along the way.”

The boy without a soul – Michael Panckridge – Novel – Goodreads Summary: “An orphan with no memory of her past, Gabrielle’s only guidance is a mysterious Voice that tells her she is not like other children, that she is on a quest that will lead her home. Still haunted by the Voice, and by the knowledge that she has been blessed, or cursed, with strange gifts, Gabrielle begins the year at a new school. She meets Michael and his younger brother, Jack. Gabrielle immediately realises that something is very wrong with Jack. Gabrielle must help Michael discover the truth behind his strange – and possibly deadly – younger brother.”

The Incredible book eating boy – Oliver Jeffers – Goodreads Summary: “Like many children, Henry loves books. But Henry doesn’t like to read books, he likes to eat them. Big books, picture books, reference books . . . if it has pages, Henry chews them up and swallows (but red ones are his favorite). And the more he eats, the smarter he gets—he’s on his way to being the smartest boy in the world! But one day he feels sick to his stomach. And the information is so jumbled up inside, he can’t digest it! Can Henry find a way to enjoy books without using his teeth? With a stunning new artistic style and a die-cut surprise, Oliver Jeffers celebrates the joys of reading in this charming and quirky picture book. It’s almost good enough to eat.”

The Librarian Who Measured the Earth – Kathryn Lasky – Goodreads Summary: “A colorfully illustrated biography of the Greek philosopher and scientistEratosthenes, who compiled the first geography book and accurately measured the globe’s circumference.”

The Library – Sara Stewart and David Small – Goodreads Summary: “Elizabeth Brown doesn’t like to play with dolls and she doesnt like to skate. What she does like to do is read books. Lots of books. The only problem is that her library has gotten so big she can’t even use her front door anymore. What should Elizabeth Brown do? Start her own public library, of course! With charming verse and watercolors Sarah Stewart and David Small celebrate one of America’s oldest and finest institutions.”

Tops and Bottoms – Janet Stevens – Goodreads Summary: “Hare solves his family’s problems by tricking rich and lazy Bear in this funny, energetic version of an old slave story. With roots in American slave tales, Tops & Bottoms celebrates the trickster tradition of using one’s wits to overcome hardship.”

Toys go out: being the adventures of a knowledgeable stingray, a tough little buffalo, and someone called Plastic – Emily Jenkins – Novels – Goodreads Summary: “Lumphy is a stuffed buffalo. StingRay is a stuffed stingray. And Plastic… well, Plastic isn’t quite sure what she is. They all belong to the Little Girl who lives on the high bed with the fluffy pillows. A very nice person to belong to. But outside of the Little Girl’s room things can be confusing. Like when Lumphy gets sticky with peanut butter on a picnic, why is he called “dirty”? Or when StingRay jumps into the bathtub, what will happen to her fur? And where in the house can they find the Little Girl a birthday present that she will love the most? Together is best for these three best friends. Together they look things up in the dictionary, explore the basement, and argue about the meaning of life. And together they face dogs, school, television commercials, the vastness of the sea and the terrifying bigness of the washing machine.”

Triffic chocolate – Alan MacDonald – Novel – Goodreads Summary: “Ever wanted to know…Who banned chocolate and started a war? Why murderers liked chocolate? Why chocolate is GOOD for your teeth? It’s all in … Totally Triffic Chocolate !”

Weslandia – Paul Fleischman – Goodreads Summary: “Enter the witty, intriguing world of Weslandia! Now that school is over, Wesley needs a summer project. He’s learned that each civilization needs a staple food crop, so he decides to sow a garden and start his own – civilization, that is. He turns over a plot of earth, and plants begin to grow. They soon tower above him and bear a curious-looking fruit. As Wesley experiments, he finds that the plant will provide food, clothing, shelter, and even recreation. It isn’t long before his neighbors and classmates develop more than an idle curiosity about Wesley – and exactly how he is spending his summer vacation.”

What You Know First – Patricia MacLachlan – Goodreads Summary: “‘A child comes to terms with the fact that she and her family are leaving the prairie. . . . As she talks herself into acceptance, her Mama helps her let go, commenting that the baby will need someone to tell him where he came from. So the girl gathers mementoes—a bag of earth and a piece of cottonwood tree. . . .A novel hides in these few pages. As with Sarah, Plain and Tall, the subext vibrates. So much is told in each perfectly chosen phrase. The story is deep and specific, but the pain and denial of a child leaving a known and loved place is all too universal.”

Want more book ideas and reviews? – Yes, I’m quite brief, but a prolific reader!  Please visit me at Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1941055-the-styling-librarian Also, please follow this blog through email updates – (do so to the right of this blog post). I appreciate all of the support, makes my day! Honored by all the wonderful followers.

FTC Required Disclosure: This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links (including linked book covers) may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you). Additionally this site is a Powells Books affiliate, and purchases made through the linked book covers may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).
© 2013 by Debbie Alvarez of The Styling Librarian. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @stylinlibrarian or at my Styling Librarian Page on Facebook.

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